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Young Turkey, 9 Days Later

On a rainy weekend, I was able to catch up with the young male turkey that has been in the Ramble this summer, and now fall.

It's starting to grow back many of its molted feathers and is starting to look a lot more normal.

If you look closely, you can see how the feathers are growing in.

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Carnivorous Content - Viewers Beware

On Saturday afternoon, before I arrive Pale Male had caught and half eaten a squirrel.  He was perched about 20 feet from the other half of the squirrel.  Lola joined him, and instead of offering her the leftovers, he began to eat them.   Lola made soft cries of protest, but he kept eating.  After  about ten minutes, she was feed up and flew over and took the rest of the squirrel from Pale Male.

She flew east, and Pale Male led us around the edge of the Great Lawn to his roost for the night.  As I left the park, I found Lola on 1040 Fifth Avenue, where she roosted for the evening.

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Young Turkey

The young Wild Turkey that has been spending time this summer in the north part of the ramble is is now looking mighty scruffy.  September is when a juvenile turkey would have a complete, post juvenile molt, so the scruffy appearance of the bird may not be cause for alarm.  The bare patterns seems symmetrical and the bare patch on the neck may be a sign that we have a male bird.

I guess we'll know for sure in a few more weeks.

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New York City Audubon Fall Roost Benefit

On Tuesday, September 23rd from 6-9 p.m. New York City Audubon will be holding its annual Fall Roost Benefit at the Boathouse in Central Park.  I've gone the last few years and have had a wonderful time and will be attending again this year.  If you live or work in New York City, you should consider attending.  Tickets start at $250, ($125 for persons under 35).

I've donated a framed print of six young ducklings chasing after their mother at Turtle Pond, to the silent auction.

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The framed, signed print is number three of a twenty-five copy edition.  The print measures 10" x 8 1/2" and the frame is 15 1/2" by 13". 

If you attend the auction, please consider bidding on the photograph.  I've donated the item, so 100% of your winning bid will go directly to support NYC Audubon’s on-going conservation and education programs in the five boroughs.

For full details of about the event and how to purchase tickets, go to the New York City Audubon website.


Pale Male and Lola This Weekend

Pale Male and Lola are doing just fine.  They've been enjoying the Beresford Apartments, the Great Lawn, the Locust Grove and building on 5th Avenue this September.

Here are some pictures of Pale Male from Saturday, and the pair on the Beresford on Sunday.

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird

The "Upper Lobe" of The Lake in Central Park has been renovated over the last year, and most of the work has been completed except for a replacement bridge, which is experiencing an engineering delay.

When I first saw the new immature plantings, I missed the old over grown brush and trees.  I was afraid birds would never return.  My fears, however have been short lived, as many birds are greatly enjoying the new native plantings.  Except for a shortage of march grasses which attracted Red-winged Blackbirds and the now empty Green Heron nest, the area is much improved.  It also has much safer landscaping, discouraging the nude sunbathing and sexual activity that was once rampant in the area.

On Saturday, the area attracted a number of birds, including this Hummingbird.

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Astoria Park Confusion

I got an email on Saturday, that two hawks had been found dead at Astoria Park.  Excellent follow up by the Urban Park Rangers in Queens discovered two dead chickens rather than hawks.  Dead chickens have been a problem in the park this summer, most likely from Santería animal sacrifices.  While I'm relieved that the hawks are in good health, I do feel some sadness about the chickens.

Here are pictures of the Astoria hawks.  Two from last weekend and three from this Sunday.

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Red-necked Phalarope At Jamaica Bay

Both the East and the West Ponds out at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge were very high after the rain on Saturday.  A Red-necked Phalarope was at the south end of the East Pond.  It was a life bird for me.

I missed by a half hour, two Bald Eagles, who had flown over the pond before I arrived.  Win some, lose some!

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