« August 2010 | Main | October 2010 »

Playground and Softball Field

One of the juveniles and the father spent time around the playground by the river south of the small ballfield before the juvenile spend about an hour on a chain link fence that surrounds the ballfield.

The juvenile drew quite a crowd while it was on the fence.  I have mixed feelings about all of the gawking.  One one hand, it helps educate New Yorkers that we have hawks in the city, but I worry that the crowds stress the juveniles, interrupt their hunting and habituate them to humans.


100926RVRT01

100926RVRT02

100926RVRT03

100926RVRT04

100926RVRT05

100926RVRT06

100926RVRT07

100926RVRT08


Softball, Soaring and Mom

My Saturday afternoon at Riverside had me finding one of the youngsters on a softball backstop, then had the youngster soaring high over the park, the mother returning to eat on the same backstop, and finally the mother on a streetlamp.

Finding all of the family in on visit is getting increasingly difficult as the juveniles are more independent. 

Later this fall, we should expect the juveniles to take off to live their live's independent of their parents.  It's one of the anti-climatic things about hawk watching.  There's no goodbye party when the kids decide to leave home, they just disappear.


100925RVRT01

100925RVRT02

100925RVRT03

100925RVRT04

100925RVRT05

100925RVRT06

100925RVRT07

100925RVRT08

100925RVRT09

100925RVRT10

100925RVRT11

100925RVRT12

100925RVRT13

100925RVRT14

100925RVRT15

100925RVRT16

100925RVRT17

100925RVRT18

100925RVRT19


Quiet Evening

Tonight, I got to see a calm fledgling take it easy for about an hour before going to roost in a tree on the North Lawn.

(Since most of the action is taking place earlier in the day, I'll be visiting the nest less often on weekdays.)


100920RVRT01

100920RVRT02

100920RVRT03

100920RVRT04


Common Sense

Today, I arrived to see one of the young fledglings surrounded by people.  The fledglings aren't scared by people, but that doesn't mean we can surround them and gawk at them like they were in a zoo.

The two fledglings need to learn to be great hunters before they leave their parents.  If we trample the underbrush, whistle at them, and stand directly under them with our iPhone cameras, the fledglings are going to be spending their time worrying about us and we'll have scared away their prey.

I guess New Yorkers are sadly, just happy to love these hawks to death.


100919RVRT01

100919RVRT02

100919RVRT03

100919RVRT04

100919RVRT05

100919RVRT06

100919RVRT07


Rat Machine

Although my schedule has prevented from seeing the hawks in the morning, fellow hawk watchers report that both fledglings have discovered the Boat Basin dumpsters, Riverside Park's Rat Machine! 
The hunting seems to take place in the late mornings.

On Friday afternoon, when I arrived, I could only find one fledgling but saw both of the parents.


100917RVRT01

100917RVRT02

100917RVRT03

100917RVRT04

100917RVRT05

100917RVRT06

100917RVRT07

100917RVRT08


Widening Range

Both fledglings are hunting successfully and have widened their range.  It makes finding and photographing them more difficult, but means they're doing just fine.  I'm actually finding it easier to find the parents these days than the kids!


100915RVRT01 

100915RVRT02

100915RVRT03

100915RVRT04

100915RVRT05

100915RVRT06


Survival Skills

On Saturday, we got to see one of the fledglings hunt and display the skills it will need to survive on its own.  It isn't independent just yet, but nice to know that its getting close, especially with the colder weather arriving.

On some other hawk blogs and forums, there has been discussion about these fledglings and their survival chances being from a second clutch.  Most of the arguments have been based on conjecture with no real data about second clutches.  Before we jump to conclusions, we might want to just take our time and observe these two fledglings and see what develops.


100911RVRT01

100911RVRT02

100911RVRT03

100911RVRT04

100911RVRT05

100911RVRT06

100911RVRT07

100911RVRT08

100911RVRT09

100911RVRT10

100911RVRT11

100911RVRT12

100911RVRT13

100911RVRT14

100911RVRT15

100911RVRT16

100911RVRT17

100911RVRT18


Across The Highway

The fledglings crossed the highway on Friday.  They're in the exact same trees and places as last year, just south of the 83rd Street playground.  This usually marks the period where they begin to do some hunting on their own, so it should be a fun few weeks.


100910RVRT01

100910RVRT02

100910RVRT03

100910RVRT04

100910RVRT05

100910RVRT06

100910RVRT07

100910RVRT08

100910RVRT09


Riding The Wind

Thursday night, I found the fledglings soaring above the trees learning how to ride the wind and use a tucked in position.  One glided over the highway and attracted a falcon, most likely an American Kestrel, who gave it a warning pass.  This attracted the mother, who kept an eye out for trouble.


100909RVRT01

100909RVRT02

100909RVRT03

100909RVRT04

100909RVRT05

100909RVRT06

100909RVRT07