Sleepy Fledglings

At Tompkins Square Park, Monday evening, I got to see both fledglings and both parents.  It was late in the day and both fledglings were very sleepy.  I was lucky enough to watch one of them fall asleep and roost for the night.  Late July and early August hawk watching can be disappointing, so it was great to see everyone.

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Tompkins Square Park

It's been too hot to do much birding over the last week or so, but the weather was cooler on Sunday.  I went down to Tompkins Square Park which was fairly quiet.  After about an hour this year's fledgling appeared on a TV antenna on a 7th Street roof.  Other than that sighting, I didn't get to see anything else.

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Tompkins Square Park

The afternoon started slowly with the fledgling (the one who hatched in the park, which locals are calling Manhattan to differentiate from the adoptee from Brooklyn) flying off a 7th Street roof and then perching in a tree for almost an hour.  I lost track of the fledgling and went down to 4th Street to watch the parents on the Most Holy Redeemer Church.

When I returned the park, the fledgling was in a tree and soon came down to the ground to eat a rat.  The kill must have been at least day old as it was covered with maggots.  After it was eaten, the hawk flew to a fence and eventually to a  7th Street rooftop.

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Tompkins Square Park Fliers

Both the adopted fledgling and the biological fledgling are starting to feel at home flying around the park and exploring the ground too.  This evening it was one happy family with the adult male feeding both youngsters.  It should be a fun summer.

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Tompkins Square Park Foster Child Adopted

The Tompkins Square Park foster child has been fully adopted by the parents in the park.  They're feeding it at least twice a day.  It however seems a little overwhelmed by the park and is still a little reticent to fly around.  It's preferring to branch around a tree rather than fly just yet. I'm sure this will work itself out over the next few days.

Thanks to the Horvaths for giving this youngster a chance to be a wild animal again.  Nothing is without risk, but giving this bird a chance to live a natural life is fantastic.

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Tompkins Square Park Foster Child

The Tompkins Square Park foster child finally decided to leave it's tree.  It first went to a fence and then spent much of the afternoon exploring the main lawn of the park.

The fact that it wasn't eager to fly back up into a tree had a few folks overly concerned.  The parents had already fed the new bird twice since it arrived.  Fledglings are like toddlers and can do silly things.  The right folks were keeping track of the bird, and everyone who needed it had the phone number of both parks employees and the rehabbers. 

Releasing a bird back isn't without risk but rescued eyasses deserve to be given a chance to be wild again.  I learned a long time ago not to second guess an established, trusted rehabber.

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Tompkins Square Park

The foster child and the fledgling were both in the same trees they had been the day before when I visited Tompkins Square Park.  What was different was the behavior of the parents.   Both were doing their best to entice both fledglings to leave their respective trees.  Christo, the adult male few around with a pigeon, making multiple passes to entice the youngsters to fly.  Dora made visits too, but without food.  However, both youngsters were content to stay perched in their respective trees.

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Tompkins Square Park Surprise

After visiting Washington Square Park and striking out in my attempt to find the fledgling (who was sighted earlier in the day), I went over to Tompkins Square Park.  To my surprise there was an extra juvenile in the park.  It has been brought by WINORR so it can be adopted by the Tompkins Square Park parents.  In almost all cases, the parents will adopt a juvenile brought into their territory, although it may take a day or two and a crying, hungry youngster for things to click.  We'll see what happens over the next few days.

The first five photographs are of the transplanted hawk from Flatbush, Brooklyn who is banded.  The others are of the Tompkins Square Park fledgling.

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Tompkins Square Park Feeding

Although we can't see or count the eyasses at Tompkins Square Park yet, due to feeding behavior by Dora, we know the nest has hatched.  Dora didn't leave the nest while I was there, but Christo was all around the park.  I can't wait to see the eyasses in a week or two.

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Tompkins Square Park

I spend a cloudy evening looking to see if the Tompkins Square Park had hatched.  This early on you look for behavioral queues from the parents, since an eyass will be too small to see at this point.  I didn't see any of the behavior I was hoping for.  This doesn't mean the nest hasn't hatched.  It just means that while I was there, I didn't see any positive signs.

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Lower East Side

My visit to the Lower East Side started with a trip to Houston and Avenue D where I saw a Red-tailed Hawk fly off a nest under construction on a school air conditioner.  This is the same site of a nest built in 2008.  We'll see what happens with this pair/nest.

Then it was off to Tompkins Square Park, where the activity was similar to yesterday's.

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