Washington Square Park

The first photograph is of the nest ledge on the Bobst library and shows the location of the two cameras. (As in past years, I suspect we'll have a small blind spot on the western side of the ledge.)

Both adults were active in the park after about 4:00 pm on Friday.  Locations visited were...

  • Both hawks soaring high above Broadway from about 3rd Street to 10th Street, escorting a third raptor away.
  • A visit by at least one hawk to One Fifth Avenue's north side
  • The female perching on a water tank roof on the NW side of the park
  • The female moving to the Silver building on the NE side of the park, perching on the AC unit, then on the NYU flagpole
  • The male appearing low first on a street lamp on Washington Square North, then a tree inside the park's NE corner
  • Both hawks then moving to the SW side of the park, the male to the Judson Cross, and the female a block outside the park on a Law School dorm roof
  • Both hawks taking off to roost for the night.  The female to an unknown location and the male to a pipe on a building at the NW corner of the park

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Web Camera Back At Washington Square

New York University has returned the camera to the Washington Square Park nest on the Bobst Library.  Thank you to those who lobbied for the camera to be returned, as well has the President's and Public Relations offices of NYU. The link on Ustream is here. 

The nest is very quiet now, but I'm looking forward to watching the feed in the spring.  The new cameras (a main one and a backup) are wonderful.

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Ocatavia and Pale Male

After my visit to see the new nest on Lexington Avenue, I went to Central Park.  I saw both Octavia and Pale Male on the north side of the Met as soon as I arrived.  Octavia quickly went south, and Pale Male went to his usual pre-bed time hunting grounds near the reservoir's south gate house.  It was great to see both of them so easily.


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95th and Lexington Avenue

There was a tweet about a new nest at 95th and Lexington Avenue on Twitter this week, so I went to check it out today.  The pair looks to be the same ones that nested at 100th and Third Avenue last year.  It looks like a better location.  It's higher and has better views than the old nest.  Unfortunately, it is across the street from a park that just was treated with rodenticides.


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Tompkins Square Park

As the days grow longer, Red-tailed Hawk couples who in the fall may have spent much of their time apart, spend more and more time together.  Today, the Tompkins Square Park spent much of the after noon close to each other.  A sign nesting season is right around the corner.

One of the hawks caught a pigeon on Avenue B around 12th Street.  I was surprised the kill was so far north.  After eating much of the pigeon, it shared the leftovers with its mate.


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First-Year Red-tailed Hawk and the Red-headed Woodpecker

I explored the SE section of Central Park on Saturday.  My first stop was The Pond, where right next to the Plaza Hotel some fun birds for the winter are a Wood Duck, Northern Pintail, and a Great Blue Heron.  Then it was off to see how the Red-headed Woodpecker was doing.  While I was on my way, I spotted a young Red-tailed hawk.  A nice afternoon of birding.


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Snack Time In The Rain

I had a quiet afternoon with one of the adult Red-tailed Hawks in Washington Square Park this afternoon.  The hawk spent at least an hour on top of 1 Fifth Avenue before coming down to hunt in the rain in the NW corner of the park.  It caught a small rodent, and looked to be on the lookout for a second snack before going to roost.  It started raining too hard for me to see how things turned out.


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Amazing eBird Checklist

The birding community has long supported citizen science by reporting bird sightings to scientists.  In our digital world, the most popular system for reporting bird sightings is run by Cornell Labs, ebird.org.

Sightings can be recored via the web or by using an iOS or Android phone app.  It's a fantastic system for reporting bird sightings, keeping your "life list" and finding out what birds have been seen in a specific area.  

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The Ross's Gull is an Arctic gull, and is rarely seen in the continental United States.  This eBird.org map shows the sightings in the US over the last five years.

Recently, a Ross's Gull was sighted near the airport at Half Moon Bay in California.  (It's an area I know well, as my sister lives only twenty minutes away in Pacifica.)    There were lots of reports sent to eBird.org as shown by this eBird.org map, Screen Shot 2017-01-19 at 10.50.55 AM

Unfortunately, the Ross's Gull was taken by a Peregrine Falcon this last Saturday, resulting in an eBirds.org checklist by Peter Sole that will go down as one of the most classic checklists ever.

Peter Sole's ebird.org checklist for the Ross's Gull.


Antarctica Penguins

I'm on vacation in Antartica.  We're having wonderful weather for their summer, highs around 36.  Penguins are plentiful, and we've seen all three members of the Pygoscelis family, Chinstrap, Adelie and Gentoo Penguins so far.


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City Hall Park

I went down to City Hall Park to look for the Western Tanager.  I saw brief glimpses of it, but also got to see two Peregrine Falcons chase a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk.  Here's a few pictures of the Red-tailed Hawk.


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Tompkins Square Park

It was a very windy afternoon on Friday.  When I arrived the two adults were escorting a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk out of their territory.  We lost track of the adult female, but the male came into the park and made two loops around the park and made a trip to the top of the Chritodora House.  It's amazing to watch hawks maneuver in high winds.  They move very fast with incredible control.


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