Washington Square Park

With the hot weather the lone eyass at Washington Square Park spent the early part of the evening lying down on the cool stone of the library.  I could only see it by walking to 9th Street and University Place.  Luckily, as things cooled off, the eyass became more active and could be photographed.


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Nice Wings

The two eyasses at Fifth Avenue are looking a lot older than when I last saw them.  They still need to grow longer tails and get some mature head feathers, but they're looking almost grown up. Their mother left them alone for over an hour this evening, another sign they're growing up.

Octavia was a little unsettled by two women using their balcony on the building just north of the nest.  Octavia was a little concerned by the new folks in the area who were just enjoying the warm weather.  She called out for about twenty minutes, voicing her displeasure at the new neighbors.


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2016 Manhattan Nests - Update 9

Please email with any corrections or additions.

Changes are the confirmation the 84th and West End nest has hatched and the viewing of a single eyass at CCNY.  The Grant's Tomb nest no longer has an eyass on the nest, but there are no signs of a fledgling, so the nest may have had an eyass death.

Hawks 2016-9


2016 Manhattan Nests - Update 8

Please email with any corrections or additions. 

Changes are the count of St. John the Divine eyasses, now 3, and the discovery of nest building activity uptown.

Hawks 2016-8


St. John The Divine

The nest which is now above the statue of St. Peter about ten feet has three eyasses this year.  With the construction over next door, and the nest bigger than last year, the parents seem back to a normal pattern this year. 


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Tompkins Square Park

The three eyasses at Tompkins Square Park and their parents were all seen this evening.  As the young ones get bigger their parents are leaving the nest unattended more often and feedings are less frequent.  They're getting grayer and less white with their primary feathers starting to be visible.  It's great to see the family doing so well.


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Chuck Will's Widow

After many gray days, Central Park had sunshine and a nice selection of migrants, including a Chuck Will's Widow.  This species usually roosts high in a tree, but this on settled on a limb only a foot off the ground, giving Central Park birders some of their best views in memory of this bird.


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Seaside Sparrows

In a little park on the Hudson River Greenway, Clinton Cov, there have been a group of Seaside Sparrows for the last few days.  This species is usually very hard to find in salt marshes, so having these birds hanging out on a lawn and median between a sidewalk and a bike path, has been a great joy for birders used to spending hours to see a brief glimpse.

There being easy to find has had its drawbacks however.  One of the sparrows became a meal for an American Kestrel on Friday.


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3 Eyasses at Tompkins Square Park

I was thrilled to see three eyasses being fed by their mother and then their father at Tompkins Square Park this evening. So were many school children who got a look at the young ones having a meal by looking at my camera screen.

If you have a spotting scope, there is a great spot to look at the nest in front of a restaurant at Avenue B just south of 7th Street.


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2016 Manhattan Nests - Update 7

Please email with any corrections or additions. 

Changes are basically in the number of eyasses confirmed at each nest.  This count will grow as the eyasses become easier to see.

Hawks 2016-7a


Washington Square Park

It's looking more and more like only one egg out of three hatched at Washington Square Park.  I was at the nest this afternoon and through the twigs could see only one eyass eating (around the 2:30 mark on the video).

One of the lesser known issues with rodenticides is their effect on fertility in raptors.  We might be witnessing this here.  While the Parks Department has stopped using poisons in Washington Square Park, they are commonly used by NYU properties around the area.


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