96th Street

The hawks at 96th Street are getting ready to leave.  One is having fun on the fire escape railing and it looks like the other two will be joining in on the fun soon. 

The neighborhood is getting excited about the hawks too.  It looks like there will be lots of eyes and ears on the fledglings.  Good luck young fellows!

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Tompkins Square Park

Tompkins Square Park continues to be frustrating.  It's so hard to see what's going on.  This nest was built for privacy!

At the end of the video, you can see two eyasses being feed. It's hard to see but you can see two.  I can't wait for these birds to get a bit bigger!

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2018 Manhattan Nest Update 14

Updates:

  1. The 310 West 72nd Street nest has three eyasses.  I had originally thought there were only two.
  2. I've received sad news that the adult male of the 96th and Lexington nest who had been picked up and sent to the Wild Bird Fund and then to a surgeon had to be euthanized.  The mother, who seemed to be courting a new male, appears to be a single mother again.

Hawks 2018-14


Fifth Avenue

The eyasses look like they're close to fledge age.  They both look great.  Octavia and Pale Male were perched near the nest too.  I can't wait for the two eyasses to venture into the park.

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310 West 72nd Street

I finally had a chance to run over to 310 West 72nd Street this afternoon.  It took about 20 minutes for a hawk to be visible.  Then two, and then three.  I had seen an early photo of the nest and thought there were only two, so three eyasses was a nice surprise.

The nest is in a wide rain gutter, so the hawks have a "runway" to explore.  It was fun to watch them go up and down the "runway".  Just before a rain shower, an adult arrived to check in on the kids.

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Mellow Hawks On A Cold Day

The Washington Square Park hawks spend most of the late afternoon and early evening huddled together in the cold weather.  Fortunately, they did take a few breaks so I could watch them.  They're looking good and should fledge in mid-June.

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2018 Manhattan Nest Update 13

We can add two more eyasses for Manhattan now that we can see the youngsters at Tompkins Square Park.  This brings us to a confirmed number of 18 eyasses for the season.  As always, I'm sure we've missed a nest or two.  We must be missing a nest or two this year in Harlem and The Heights.

We'll soon be seeing lots of eyasses leave their nests over the next three weeks.  I suspect we'll see some fledges late this week.  Hawk watchers who've been stuck on a bench for two and a half months are going to get lots of exercise soon!

Hawks 2018-13


At Least Two Eyasses in Tompkins Square Park

We finally got to see an eyass after watching feedings for a week in Tompkins Square Park.  I was able to see two at once, so we've got at least two, possibly three eyasses this year.

Both Christo and Amelia were involved in the feedings today, and Christo as taken to staying close to the nest when he's not on it.  It's so nice that after all the drama earlier this year, things are back to normal.

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Watched Over

The three eyasses at 96th Street looked great and the should be fledging in a week or two.  It will be interesting to see where they fledge to.  Usually New York City nests have real parks nearby.  This nest has more of an asphalt school playground then a real park nearby.

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Grant's Tomb

I took a trip up to Grant's Tomb to see the eyasses before they fledged.  The three looked great.  No sign of the parents, but that's not surprising this late.  I'm sure they were nearby.

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Foggy Afternoon At Fifth Avenue

It was a foggy afternoon at the Model Boat Pond.  When I arrived the eyasses were sleeping with Octavia, their mother, two buildings down on Fifth Avenue.  Soon, Pale Male arrived with food and brought it to the nest.  One eyass ate the new prey and the other ate leftovers. 

One tried to eat too big a piece.  The first time I saw this I worried that the eyass would choke, but it seems to be a common behavior as they learn to tear food and eat on their own.  I've now seen it dozens of time, and nothing ever goes wrong!

At the end of the afternoon, there was some "jump-flapping".  But the eyasses were very mellow, which makes sense given the weather.

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Exploring The Ledge

The eyasses are starting to roam out of the nest and onto the window ledge that supports the nest.  They were fun to watch today.  I was there in the early evening.  I watched a food delivery, a feeding (with one eyass feeding itself), and some "jump flapping".

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Feedings and Blue Jays

When I arrived Amelia was feeding.  (It will still be some time before we know how many youngsters we have.) 

Christo was near the nest.  He then attacked a Blue Jay nest.  From there, he flew to a church on Avenue B where he was harassed by a group of Blue Jays for an extended period.  You can't blame the Jays as they were protecting their young.  After things calmed down, Christo ate a pigeon and then flew to the nest.

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Kestrel and Eyasses

When I arrived at the 96th Street nest this afternoon, the mother was on a nearby building being harassed by an American Kestrel. She took it in stride. 

She had gotten her chest wet, something that is commonly seen with Red-tailed Hawks.  It's a mini bath that doesn't get the flight feathers wet.  So her ragged appearance is nothing to worry about.

The eyasses looked healthy and well fed as usual.

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2018 Manhattan Nest Update 12

Two positive updates...

  1. The Tompkins Square Nest (now with the third female of the season, Amillia) has hatched.  The eyasss are too little to count just yet, but we have at least one youngster.
  2. The female at 96th Street is no longer a single parent.  It is unclear if she has a new mate or if the old mate was returned from rehab, but local hawk watchers are seeing two adults now.

Update: After posting this, I was sent photos confirming three, not two eyasses at Grant's Tomb.  This had been corrected below.

Hawks 2018-12


Punk Bands and Feedings

The hawk watchers of Tompkins Square Park, saw a feeding and an hour long visit by Christo (the father) last night.  I went down this afternoon to help confirm the hatch.  I saw two feedings, one around 1:15 and one around 3:30.  The eyass(es) are too young and small to see from the ground, but it's clear that the nest has youngsters.

After all of the drama with Dora, Nora and now Amelia it is so nice that the Lower East Side has a nest that has hatched this year.

(It says a lot about the difference between Washington Square and Tompkins Square parks when realize which bands play in which park. Especially when you consider they are only a ten minute walk from each other.)

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