Peregrine Falcon at the Reservoir

I finally caught up with the Peregrine Falcon that likes to sun on the north edge of the Reservoir in Central Park for the first time this winter.  We had a pair in the same tree last year, and a single Peregrine the year before.  This one was very vocal.  I couldn't see what it was concerned about, but if it was like last year, it was most likely a Red-tailed Hawk.

It's nice to have the Peregrine back.  The low tree branch the bird perches in gives great looks at the bird.

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Beresford Red-tailed Hawk

One of the hawks from the failed San Remo nest was on the Beresford Apartments on Thursday and Friday.  The pair which keeps laying eggs on the San Remo before their nest is done, did use this Beresford location to nest one year before abandoning the nest after a few weeks.  This had been Pale Male's mate Lola's favorite winter spot for years before she died.  So, whenever I see a hawk in this window it reminds me of her.

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From December to January

Two wonderful birds, seen in December have stayed for the New Year in the north of Central Park.  An immature Red-Headed Woodpecker at 98th and the West Drive and a Green-Winged Teal, which was first seen on the Harlem Meer, rediscovered on the Reservoir on the Christmas Bird Count, and is now hanging out on the The Pool at 102nd Street.  It is nice they have stayed. 

They aren't rare birds for the New York area, but they are infrequent visitors to Central Park.  So, it's nice to be able to have more than just a brief look at them both.  The woodpecker continues to dig out cavities and cache acorns, while the teal, seems happy to hang out with the Mallards.

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Eastern Red Bat

One of the joys of a warm winter's day is finding an Eastern Red Bat hunting or perched on a tree. While Eastern Red Bats usually hunt at night, they will hunt during the day on a warm winter's day.

Today, was such a day.  Erika Piik found one flying in the Maintenance Field which is in The Ramble around 78th Street west of the East Drive.  The bat would hunt insects for 30 minutes and then perch for a similar amount of time.  It perched once on a tree trunk and once on tree branch.  While flying it avoided being eaten by a Cooper's Hawk, not once but twice! 

In addition to photographing the bat, I was able to get nice recordings.

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Pale Male

On Wednesday, Pale Male was on one of his favorite buildings at 73rd and Fifth Avenue.  I has seen him at dusk further north on Monday and watched him catch a rat. 

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