Park Avenue and St. John the Divine
Juvenile Red-tailed Hawk Up By The Pool

Sunday Hat Trick

I took a visit to three of the Manhattan nests on Sunday and found them all with brooding mothers.  (The fourth nest I know about in Manhattan is located at 888 Seventh Avenue, and its location, makes it difficult to determine if the mother is brooding yet.)

Inwood Hill
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The Inwood Hill female sitting on her nest.

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The male (on right) arrives.

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The female takes a brief break from sitting on the eggs.

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She preens a little bit.

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I thought there would be a nest exchange, with the male giving the female a break, but not this time.

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He flies off north.

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The blur of his wing is on the left.

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She settles in keeping an eye out for all of the noisy Blue Jays that are about.

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The male returns, and this time we will have an exchange.

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He settles down on the nest.

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Then the female returns.

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And they swap places.

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He's off in a flash.

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She settles down onto her eggs.


St. John the Divine

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The female was on Gabriel's horn shortly after I arrived.

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She then returns to the nest.

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After her tail is tucked in, you can't see her on the nest.

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The male after leaving the nest ends up on Gabriel's horn.

 

Fifth Avenue

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When I entered the park, Pale Male was on the SE tower of the Beresford.

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I only got to see Lola's tail for a few moments!

 

It was a great day seeing three pairs of Red-tailed Hawks thrive in Manhattan, each in their own way.