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Model Boat Pond

I visited the Model Boat Pond at dusk to listen for bats, and was able to detect two species, Big Brown Bat and Silver-haired Bat.  But before it got dark, I saw Octavia return to the nest and got brief glimpses of the two eyasses.

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2018 Manhattan Nest Update 9

Since the last update:

  1. A third eyass has been seen at 96th Street.
  2. The 72nd and West End nest has hatched.
  3. Inwood Hill Park's nest has hatched and one eyass has been seen (although there may be more).
  4. Activity at St. John the Divine nest suggests that the nest may have failed.

Hawks 2018-9


350 Update

It looks like the St. John nest may have failed this year and I've been worried about the new 350 Central Park West nest as well.  Luckily, I realized that the late hatching of the 350 Central Park West nest may be OK.  I first saw the female sitting on the nest on April 6th.   The eggs hatch between 28-35 days after being laid.   That would put the hatch at May 11th for the first egg.  However, female hawks can sit a few days before they start laying eggs and the eggs don't all get laid at once.  So, we need to add about a week more after the May 11th date, as the outside hatch date.

So keep your figures crossed for the 350 Central Park West nest.  It's not uncommon for a new nest to fail, so we should be prepared for a failure, but hope for the best.

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Kirtland's Warbler

Found by Kevin Topping on Friday, hundreds of birders got great looks at a Kirtland's Warbler in Central Park today.  Its migration path is usually up and down the Mississippi River, so this was a very rare event.

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Spring Migration

The lens I use for hawk watching was in for repair the last week, so I spent my time enjoying the spring migration.  Highlights included a Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Prothonotary Warbler, Common Nighthawk, Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron, and a Northern Cardinal nest.

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Grant's Tomb

I finally had a chance to visit Grant's Tomb this season.  The nest is now in front of the Tomb and is much more visible than the old nest.  There are two eyasses this year.  I didn't get to see a feeding, but I did get to see a Peregrine Falcon from the Riverside Church nest, hassle one of the parents.

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2 or 3

The Fifth Avenue nest's eyasses are still a bit too small to see clearly.  It may well turn out that there are only two.  This evening's meal was gray squirrel.

Update 5/10/18: It looks like we have only two eyasses this year.

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Enjoying Pale Male

I recently gave a talk on Enjoying Pale Male.  I thought I would share the slides from the talk.  Click on the slide or use your keyboard's right arrow to advance to the next slide.  Hovering over the left edge allows you to skip to a specific slide.

(The player can be buggy, so don't get frustrated if you have problems.)