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350 CPW Hatches

It was great to receive reports that hawk watchers saw a feeding on Sunday at 350 Central Park West.  It's very hard to establish a new territory, and after the death of the male last year, it was unclear that this nest would work out this year.

When I arrived early on Monday afternoon a feeding was already in progress.  I caught the tale end of it.  I came back later in the afternoon and caught a few visits to the nest by the male.  Like many new Red-tail Hawk fathers he wasn't sure how much food to bring to the nest. 

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2019 Manhattan Red-tailed Hawk Nest Update 6

I've been busy watching spring migrants, but have gotten news about two nests.

1) Susan Kirby recorded feedings at 350 Central Park West.  Her video is on YouTube.  This is wonderful news.  In a few weeks, when the eyasses grow a little bigger this should be a wonderful nest to watch.  The nest is ten stories up, and five windows from the north and is best viewed from in front of the playgrounds either at 96/97th or 93rd from the sidewalk of the east side of Central Park West.

2) The third egg hatched at Washington Square.  The camera was restored a few years ago.  The URL is https://www.ustream.tv/channel/e3uYJSDgmbz  On a mobile phone, download the ustream application and search for "NYU Hawk Cam".

Hawks 2019


927 Fifth Avenue Intruders

Two Red-tailed Hawks, other than Pale Male and Ocatvia, flew over the Fifth Avenue nest on Saturday evening causing both Octavia and Pale Male to leave the nest.  Usually we only see a single intruder, usually a single juvenile or adult hawk enter the territory.  Two adult hawks together seems unusual for this time year.  While it was impossible to know, it could have been the San Remo pair investigating how their neighbors are doing.

The video has Pale Male on the nest and then leaving, Octavia returning, and then Octavia settling down.  Estimates are that this nest is due to hatch sometime this week.  No feedings have been seen yet, although Pale Male has brought a small mouse to the nest, which may be a positive sign.

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Tompkins Square Park

I made my first trip of the year down to Tompkins Square Park today.  Christo and Amelia are doing well this year, with none of the "threesome" drama of last year.  Their nest, in the same location as last year, may have been the earliest to hatch in Manhattan. Amelia was keeping the eyasses warm, with Christo making a visit and then Amelia feed the eyasses in the early afternoon.  The eyasses are still a bit too little to see (and count) just yet.

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Pale Male and Octavia

I got to see Pale Male make a visit to the nest and see Octavia take a stretch in the early evening tonight.  Their eggs should be hatching soon.

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Indigo Bunting

An Indigo Bunting was at the Evodia Field Feeders in the Ramble of Central Park today and yesterday.  Usually a tough bird to find in the park, this one was easy to watch as it ate bird seed from a feeder.

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Hatch Watch

I've been looking at nests near Central Park and haven't seen any sign of hatches.  I've looked at 927 Fifth Avenue, 350 Central Park West, St. John the Divine, and 100th Street and Third Avenue.  (Since early feedings are about two hours apart and the parents still sit on top of the new hatched eyasses, there is a possibility any of these nests has hatched without me knowing.)

I look forward to taking another look this weekend at these nests.  Below are two pictures of the 350 Central Park West nest and two pictures of the 100th Street and Third Avenue nest.

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White-winged Dove

Joe DiCostanzo identified a White-winged Dove at the Evodia Feeders of Central Park this afternoon among a group of Mourning Doves.  The bird is usually seen in the far south.  While it is seen along the Northeast Coast up through Maine and into Canada on rare occasions, it may be the first recorded sighting for Manhattan.  Great birding Joe!

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Great Horned Owl

There was a Great Horned Owl in Central Park on Wednesday.  There are concerns by many Central Park birders that owl safety is being compromised for "twitter likes" and so I thought it might be good idea to wait a few days before posting these photos.

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The San Remo

One of the adults was on the "nest" which had a plastic bag and a few twigs.  Since a female Red-tail can take almost a week to lay three eggs, I'm not sure if we might see another egg so I've been keeping an eye out when I'm nearby.  Today, I didn't get any answer to what's happening.

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Central Park West Nests

I looked at the two Central Park Red-tailed Hawk nests on Tuesday.

On the San Remo, one of the hawks was on the ledge.  It flew in and out a few times.  Most of the twigs have blown off.  The female may have an egg or two more to lay so I'll be keeping an eye on the ledge over the next few days.

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350 CPW continues to look good.  The female was sitting on the eggs and rolled them while I was there.  I'm looking forward to eyasses in late April.

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Fort Washington Park

The new nest in Fort Washington Park, may be a replacement for the J. Hood Wright nest.  It's right next to Henry Hudson Parkway, so it will be interesting to see how the fledglings do.  It has the benefit of a no-man's land between the Parkway and the railroad tracks, but also the danger.  I saw the female on the nest and the male, who chased out a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk.

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2019 Manhattan Red-tailed Hawk Nest Update 4

Two changes:

  • I've added the San Remo nest to the list of nests.   While they lost an egg, there is a slight possibility that they will lay additional eggs.
  • A new nest has been identified for Manhattan.  Thanks to Jessica Ancker, who saw a photographer's Facebook post of the nest.  The nest is just west of the south lane of the Henry Hudson Parkway, and east of the Amtrak tracks at 164th Street.  It can be seen from Riverside Drive or from Fort Washington Park.

Hawks 2019


Egg Lost

Neither of the San Remo hawks was sitting on the nest late this morning, so I assume they lost their egg to gravity sometime in the last 24 hours. 

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Not Again!

The good news is that the San Remo hawks have an egg.  The very sad news is that yet again they haven't built a proper nest and while the egg didn't roll off the ledge, it came very close to being lost this afternoon.  It is more than likely that this couple will have a failed nest again this year.

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The San Remo

The San Remo/Beresford pair are again trying to build a nest on The San Remo's north tower.  They brought sticks, copulated and then brought plastic bags to the nest.  In the high winds, it looked as though they lost more material than they had brought in.  This pair just can't get its act together.  They have has a serious of failed nesting attempts, including letting an egg fall in 2016.

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Silver-haired Bat at The Pond

I saw a Silver-haired Bat (and recorded its echo location) flying around the southern end of Turtle Pond. On days early or late in the season it is not uncommon to see a bat in the late afternoon.  Nice to see my third bat in a week.

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