350 Central Park West

I've been hoping to see signs that the 350 Central Park West has hatched over the last week.  I made three visits, but came up empty each time.  I thought they should have hatched my now and I would have seen a feeding by now, but I'm a bit confused about when brooding started.

 


350 Central Park West

I'm not certain of the timing, but I think due for a hatch at 350 Central Park West within the next week. I went up today and saw the male bring a squirrel and took over incubation duties, so the female could eat and explore.  I didn't see any signs of a feeding, so I don't think the nest has hatched yet.  It's a long hike for me to visit the next, but I'll make another visit at the end of the week.

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350 Central Park West Brooding Confirmed

In the fog, I was able to watch the 350 Central Park nest and confirm the pair is brooding.  The nest seems better built than the last two years, and offers more protection.   I had to watch from between 96th and 97th Streets on Central Park West to see her.  Being so far way means camera shake and atmospheric distortion, but I was able to see the female brooding.

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Another Day At 350 CPW

There wasn't much excitement this afternoon.   Just the usual pre-brooding stuff.  A copulation, some nest rearranging to make sure it is "just right", and then lots of hanging around close to the nest.  Bring on the eggs.

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350 Central Park West Reboot

The hawk nest at 350 Central Park West has had a hard time.  In 2018, the male died during the incubation period and while the female tried she could not incubate alone.  In 2019, after about two weeks, the eyasses (baby hawks) died on the nest and the female died a few weeks later. 

Over this last year, the nest was removed during fa├žade work on the building. 

So, it's been a wonderful surprise that in under two weeks, the nest has been rebuilt.  If this nest wasn't so well watched, you might never know that the nest is new and both hawks aren't the originals. 

On Wednesday and Thursday, I got to see a lot of the hawks.  Early in the day or late in the day is best to catch up with them.  I saw them on the nest, bringing twigs, copulating and hunting. 

But what I didn't expect was what we got to see late on Thursday.  The male when from the nest to the 96th Street transverse road.  He would go about 100 feet, stopping mostly on streetlights.  He got to Fifth Avenue and 97th and did something I never would have expected.  He flew to Madison Avenue, then went south to 95th stopping first at 96th, before flying west back to the park.  What an urban hawk!

If you're trying to learn who is who, take a look at them copulating.   There are lots of field marks if you look closely. 

Let's hope "third time's a charm" for this nest.  It would be nice to see at least one year work out well for this nest.

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350 Central Park West

This location is active again with the pair rebuilding the nest.  The male is bringing sticks to the old location on an air conditioner and the new female to a faux balcony a few stories higher.  It will be interesting to see who wins.  I only got a few pictures of one of the hawks today, although I saw both escort an intruder out of the area.

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Troubling Signs At 350 Central Park West

When I visited the 350 Central Park West nest on May 9th, everything seemed fine.  The mother was feeding, the father nearby and three healthy eyasses were popping up.

On Tuesday, I saw no signs of life in the nest and no sign of the parents.  I stayed for over an hour in a light rain.  While it is possible that the eyasses have grown enough for the parents to leave them alone for an extended period of time, it seems odd this early in the season.

I will revisit the nest soon, but we should prepare ourselves for bad news about this nest.

350CPW


Yet Another 350 CPW Feeding

My timing seems to be great at 350 Central Park West.  I arrived yet again to see a feeding in progress.  Three eager babies were getting fed.  The father was nearby and perched on the building to the north of 350 Central Park West for about fifteen minutes.

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Three Eyasses at 350 CPW

In the early stages of watching a nest, the eyasses are too small to see, so you have to wait until they get a bit bigger to count them.  Today, I was excited to see that the nest had three eyasses.  During the feeding, for the most part it looked like two eyasses, but at one point all three heads were visible.  Congratulations to the new parents.

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350 CPW Baby Pictures

During a feeding this afternoon, I got to see the first glimpse of an eyass (baby hawk) on the 350 Central Park West nest.  It was only for about a second, but it was great to see.  Red-tailed Hawks usually have clutches of two or three, so I suspect more heads will be seen in the days to come.

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350 CPW Calm

I spent less than an hour watching the 350 Central Park West nest on Friday. 

It was a great birding day for the park, so hawks took a backseat.  I saw 53 species.  It helped that ended the day birding with Nadir Souirgi's  New York City Audubon Birding Tour of the North Woods, which leaves from 103rd and Central Park West, at 5:30 p.m. Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays during migration.  It's free and Nadir is an excellent birder and walk leader. Details are on the New York City Audubon, www.nycaudubon.org website.

While I was at the nest not much happened.  The female stood up with her lower chest near the eyasses for most of the time.  This is another sign that all of the eggs have hatched and brooding is over.

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Another 350 CPW Feeding

After a great day of watching migrating birds in Central Park, including 17 warbler species, I made my way up to 350 Central Park West.  The mother was in the middle of a feeding when I arrived.  She then left the nest unattended a few times and the male made a visit.  She returned and they both stared into the nest together.  Given the behavior I saw today, I suspect that all the eggs have hatched. 

When I was watching earlier in the week, she seemed intent to feed as quickly as possible and then get back down on the nest, as though at least one egg hadn't hatched (they hatch a few days apart) and incubation was still needed.  (This is only a guess.  An alternative reason could be, that with today's warm weather rather than the colder weather we had early in the week, she felt comfortable leaving the nest.) 

The newly hatched hawks still need their parents to help stay warm.  It will be another 10-14 days before they can regulate their own temperature enough to be left alone for an extended period.

The eyasses (newly hatched hawks) are too small to see from the street just yet.  This neighborhood is full of school children and they should be able to enjoy watching the eyasses grow up this year.  The young hawks be on the nest for about 45 days and then move to Central Park by late June, staying the summer before leaving home.

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350 CPW Hatches

It was great to receive reports that hawk watchers saw a feeding on Sunday at 350 Central Park West.  It's very hard to establish a new territory, and after the death of the male last year, it was unclear that this nest would work out this year.

When I arrived early on Monday afternoon a feeding was already in progress.  I caught the tale end of it.  I came back later in the afternoon and caught a few visits to the nest by the male.  Like many new Red-tail Hawk fathers he wasn't sure how much food to bring to the nest. 

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Central Park West Nests

I looked at the two Central Park Red-tailed Hawk nests on Tuesday.

On the San Remo, one of the hawks was on the ledge.  It flew in and out a few times.  Most of the twigs have blown off.  The female may have an egg or two more to lay so I'll be keeping an eye on the ledge over the next few days.

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350 CPW continues to look good.  The female was sitting on the eggs and rolled them while I was there.  I'm looking forward to eyasses in late April.

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350 CPW Exchange

In the middle of the afternoon, I got to see the male of the 350 Central Park West nest give the female a nest a break from incubation duties.  It was 45 seconds of excitement after an hour of watching the female sit on the nest!

Birding in other areas of the park made up for the hours wait.  Spring migration is finally started and new species are arriving daily and general number are higher too.  I had three new species for the year, Great Egret, Black-crowned Night-Heron and Golden-crowned Kinglet.

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