Ramble Red-tailed Hawk

A young Adult Red-tailed Hawk was hanging around the Evodia Field in Central Park's Ramble on Tuesday afternoon.  As fall migration heats up, we should see more and more visitors in Central Park.  A Northern Flicker, American Robins and a Gray Squirrel can be heard on the video's soundtrack.

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Randalls Island

I made a trip to Randalls Island on Sunday afternoon.  The nest is in the field lights of Field 10, just north of Icahn Stadium.  I found two eyasses on the nest and the mother on a light tower of Icahn Stadium.

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Fort Washington Park

The new nest in Fort Washington Park, may be a replacement for the J. Hood Wright nest.  It's right next to Henry Hudson Parkway, so it will be interesting to see how the fledglings do.  It has the benefit of a no-man's land between the Parkway and the railroad tracks, but also the danger.  I saw the female on the nest and the male, who chased out a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk.

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Randalls Island

Randalls Island has had a nest in the lights of Field 10 just north of Icahn Stadium for a number of years.  When there were Peregrine Falcons on the hospital, I think we skipped a year, but otherwise the pair has breed consistently over the last few years.

This year was no exception.  The female was on the nest and in the warm sun left the eggs for a few minutes to take a stretch.

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Young Red-tailed Hawk

On Thursday afternoon a young Red-tailed Hawk was eating a squirrel on a rock south of the Azalea Pond in Central Park's Ramble.  It is an interesting bird with one red tail feather.  We usually see the brown tail feathers of a juvenile change one by one over the summer to adult red feathers, so this one red feather is unusual.

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Bats and a Red-tailed Hawk

I stopped by Central Park's Pond on my way home.  The Pond is located just north of the Plaza Hotel at the south east end of the park.  The usual suspects were there, including a Wood Duck, a Black-crowned Night Heron, Mallards and Canada Geese, plus the hundreds of Common Grackles coming home to roost in the trees surrounding the Pulitzer Fountain of Grand Army Plaza.

What I didn't expect to find were two Eastern-Red Bats feeding at around 6 p.m.  Usually, I need to rely on my Echo Meter Touch to identify my bats, but these were clearly Eastern-Red Bats just by watching them.  I did my best to get some pictures without flash in the low light.

After sunset, a Red-tailed Hawk flew around the Pond and the buildings on Central Park South.  I suspect one of the adults we saw bringing nesting materials to Crown Building earlier this year.  These hawks continue to be a mystery, but it was good to see they're still around.

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Randalls Island

I finally had time to go out to Randalls Island and see this year's nest.  There seem to be two eyasses this year.  The nest is in the lights of Field 10, just north of the stadium.

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96th and Lexington Avenue

On the fourth floor level of the fire escape on a building on the northwest corner of 96th and Lexington Avenue, there is a new hawk nest.  The female was brooding when I arrived and the male was briefly on a water tank before flying out of view.  I stayed until after sunset, but didn't see a nest exchange between the two hawks.

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Juvenile Cooper's Hawk

On Saturday afternoon, I walked for about five miles through Central Park. I was able to add three more birds to my 2018 Manhattan list, a Ring-Necked Duck (female at the North Gate House of the Reservoir), a Great Cormorant (on the dike in the middle of the Reservoir, a rare visitor to Central Park, but seen frequently off Randalls Island in the winter) and an immature Cooper's Hawk.

The Cooper's Hawk was exploring the Loch, a waterway with three waterfalls that flows under the Glen Span and Huddlestone arches from The Pool to the Harlem Meer.  It has recently been restored by the Central Park Conservancy. The restoration carefully reshaped the waterway, to provide a mix of currents and depths designed to maximize biodiversity, with the help of a environmental consulting company.  Improved landscaping was also added to minimize erosion and run offs from the North Meadow Ball Fields.  I'm looking forward to seeing the biodiversity results in a few years.

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Juvenile Red-Tailed Hawk, Peregrine Falcon, Two Adult Red-Tailed Hawks

I started my raptor watching in the North Woods and then worked my way around the reservoir.  My first raptor was a Juvenile Red-Tailed Hawk at the Wildflower meadow, who then flew around the Compost Heap.  Then it was off to the reservoir, where a Peregrine Falcon has been seen for the last few days near the North Gate House. Then after looking at the nice selection of waterfowl using the open areas of reservoir, I ran into two adult hawks at the South Gate House.  By then it was too dark to I.D. the hawks, but it looked like one of them was an intruder and the other was either Pale Male or Octavia.

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J. Hood Wright Park

I finally had a chance to get up to J. Hood Wright Park and found the mother doing her best to keep her eyasses out of the sun.  After the sun got lower, she took a break.  The nest has three eyasses this year.

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CCNY

I finally got up to CCNY to find two hawks hanging out and not brooding.  What was interesting was one was young, less than a year old, with a brown tail.  It will be interesting to see if anything comes of this nest in 2017 or if we'll need to wait until 2018?

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Awesome Foursome

I got a text from Ranger Rob Mastrianni today saying that the J. Hood Wright Park nest had four eyasses in their nest.  That's very, very rare.  So, I took the A train up to 175th Street and took a look this evening.  I got to see all four of them.  It's a good thing I went today, since one of them looks ready to leave nest. 

I love these surprises.  When the eyasses were younger most folks could only tell that there were one or two eyasses on the nest.


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116th and Riverside Has Hatched

Although we can't see the eyasses yet, frequent trips off the nest by the female, flies, what look like feedings and the male bringing in food, make it clear the nest has hatched.  Nice to see a young couple with a new nest be successful.  Between this nest, the Grant's Tomb nest and the Peregrine Falcons on Riverside Church this should be a fun area to watch.  And St. John the Divine is also a short walk away!


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