Best and Worst of Times

On the day that the Washington Square Hawks had their first egg hatch, the Central Park West hawks gave up on their 322 Central Park West nest.

Tonight, I first found one of the hawks on the back of 350 CPW, on a ledge on 94th Street.  The hawk left the perch and when I got back to CPW, the two hawks were copulating on a building on 93rd Street.  Then the female went off to a tree in the park.

We'll see what happens.  The hawks look to be building a new nest on a different location on 350 CPW. 


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Central Park West Drama

After receiving reports that the Central Park West had been taken down, I went to the park today to look for the hawks.  You can imagine my surprise when I found a hawks sitting on a slightly smaller nest than I had seen on the weekend.   (It's not clear if the female has laid eggs just yet, or will be in the next few days.)

When I got home, folks on the WSP chat room directed me to the Pale Male Irregulars website.  It had news of destruction of the nest by the construction company working on the façade. There was also a story in the New York Post.

Lets hope the hawks can rebuild the nest in time to make a good go of it this year.

Update: 4/11/13.  I was sent a photograph today that showed the female sitting on the ledge with one egg having rolled away from her.  Without a proper nest bowl, she may have had to choose to incubate only one egg.


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Central Park West Update

The pair on Central Park West continues to copulate and doesn't seem quite ready to settle down to nesting just yet.  Reports are that they are not bothered by the construction crews on the building where they have built there nest so this is great news.  On Sunday, I saw them copulate on the south tower of the Eldorado and watched the male fly in the high winds.


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Central Park West

The Central Park pair on the west side in the 90s looks to have completed their nest.  I found them both on Central Park West at 93rd, eating a pigeon and then copulating.  Let's hope they do well and aren't disturbed by the construction on the nest building.


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Central Park Hawks

Today was a nice day in Central Park.  I had the two Red-tailed hawks trying to establish a nest on CPW, (now working on a nest on 322 CPW.)  Then a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk on the American Museum of Natural History followed by Sharp-shinned Hawk in the Evodia Field. 

My next stop was Fifth Avenue, where Octavia is now brooding.  Pale Male was tending to the nest (rearranging twigs as is his habit) and she returned to the nest.

A quick walk down to Central Park South uncovered one Red-tailed hawk there. Seven hawks, not too bad for a brief afternoon visit to the park.


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Central Park Tennis Courts

Two Red-tails appeared over the Reservoir this afternoon, soared together and then came back down to perch about 100 yards apart near the Tennis Courts in Central Park.  This is the pair that was bringing twigs to 350 Central Park West earlier in the week.

They stayed in the same trees for about twenty minutes, and didn't like they were going to be moving soon, so I moved on.   Let's hope they stay in the park this spring.


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350 Central Park West

I got an email yesterday from Emily, a resident of 350 Central Park West, that a pair of hawks were building a nest on the 15th Floor of her building.  

I got to see the pair this evening. The hawks are building on an air conditioner, on the right most faux balcony. I watched them copulating on the north tower of The Eldorado and bringing twigs to 350 Central Park West. (94 and 95th Street are the cross streets.)  The nest building is in the very early stages, so there is still a good chance the hawks could decide to nest elsewhere.  

But if the hawks do nest on Central Park West, we might have a bumper copy of young hawks in the park this summer.  Between this new nest, the new nest on the Plaza Hotel, Pale Male's nest on 5th Avenue, and the St. John the Divine nest, whose kids always end up in the north end of Central Park, we could have lots of fledglings in the park.

Of course a lot could happen between now and summer, but a hawk watcher can always dream!


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Barred Owl vs. Immature Red-tailed Hawk

You always hear that owls and hawks don't interact much, but a young Red-tailed Hawk didn't get the message.  It's been harassing the Barred Owl that's in Central Park for the past few weeks.

Tonight the Barred Owl must have had enough.  The Red-tailed Hawk tried to roost in a tree the Barred Owl used to use during the day, so the Barred Owl flew out early and chased the Red-tail away.


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Hawk in Madison Square

I was taking pictures of the Flatiron Building in New York City, when I saw a hawk fly in and land on what used to be the northern Toy Center building, which is undergoing renovation.  It landed and returned south.  It was dark, so I couldn't get a good enough I.D. to figure out if it was one of the Washington Square hawks, the hawk that had been seen hanging around the park, or just a migrating hawk.


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Astoria Park

I took a visit to Queens to check out a nest on the Triborough (RFK) Bridge.  It's been on the bridge for some time, although one year the nest was on the opposite side of the bridge.  Like so many nests in New York City, it had a parent die from poisoning.

Astoria is a nice quiet neighborhood full of friendly people.  Sometimes I get burnt out answering scores of questions from hawk watchers in Manhattan, and Astoria makes a wonderfully relaxed trip.   The nest is near the next to the last stop of the N train, which is a quick trip from where I live in Manhattan.

This year the nest has three eyasses, which seem to be about a month old.


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Four Dead Hawks

Within the last few weeks there have been four dead Red-tailed Hawks found on the Upper West Side: three in Central Park, and one in Riverside Park.  The hawks were:

  • A juvenile that was in the North Woods of Central Park
  • Lima, Pale Male's mate of a year
  • An older hawk in the SE corner of Central Park
  • The female of the Boat Basin nest in Riverside Park

While necropsy results are still pending, the likelihood that rodenticides were the cause of death is an urban reality.

As hawks have made a comeback in New York City over the last twenty years, we're seeing the issues hawks face living in the Big Apple.

I know from personal experience that we have lots of allies in this effort, including the Parks Department, the Central Park Conservancy, the Department of Health, NYC Audubon, and others.  While we figure out how to turn our anger over these deaths into action, we need to be careful not to attack our allies. 

This is an incredibly complex issue.  A few hundreds raptors in New York City aren't going to limit the rat populations.  Controlling rat infestations utilizing methods that have the least potential for negative impact on wildlife is going to take years of incremental change.  We'll need the help of all our allies as we tackle long term issues, such as improving sanitation and reducing poison usage.

It isn't publicized enough, but behind the scenes, there are many people working to protect raptors in the city.  So, rather than attacking our friends over these deaths, we should approach the Riverside and Central Park staff, not with the question "Why did you kill our hawks?", but with the questions "How can I help you protect our hawks?  And what support do you need from me?"


Madison Square Park

A young hawk has been hanging around Madison Square Park since early October.  I've heard reports and been sent a few pictures, but today was the first time I saw the youngster in person. 

(I only had a point and shoot camera with me, so the pictures aren't that great.)  It's most likely a migrant from further north and not a hawk from Manhattan, but you never know!

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San Francisco

I'm on vacation in San Francisco.  My hotel is on Nob Hill.  In the mid-afternoon I saw some pigeons in flight out my window and wondered if there was a hawk nearby.  It turns out there were two Red-tailed Hawks, an adult and an immature bird.

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Young Red-tailed Hawk

There was a young Red-tailed Hawk flying between 100th and 111th Street along Fifth Avenue this afternoon. It was impossible to tell if it was a migrant or a hawk that was born on a nearby nest this spring.


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Christmas Bird Count Weekend

The annual Central Park Christmas Bird Count was on Sunday.  It's a great event that brings together the Urban Park Rangers, the Parks Department, Audubon NYC and lots of amateur birders to take a census of the birds wintering in the park.

After a series of bad weather counts with snow, rain or bitterly cold temperatures, this count had enjoyable, if chilly weather.

The day before, I looked for the two unusual birds that have been around, the Varied Thrush and a young Red-Headed Woodpecker (which at this age, has yet to get a red head.)  Along the way I had nice looks at a Cooper's hawk.

On Sunday, I joined the Northeast team.  Highlights for me were a Carolina Wren and young Red-tailed Hawk at Mount Sinai Hospital.  After our counting was done, our team saw a Merlin in the Northwest team's area, I saw a young Red-tail being harrased by Pale Male at 63rd and Fifth, and at dusk I watched the park's surviving Eastern Screech-Owl's fly out.

The count had 62 species of birds, including birds from the count week.  There are lots of birds in Central Park, even in the winter!  The count had 11 Red-tailed Hawks, 9 Cooper's Hawks, 2 Merlins, 1 Sharp-shinned Hawk, 1 Peregrine Falcon, and 1 Eastern Screech-Owl.


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A Little Wet At Riverside

I arrived at Riverside on Sunday after a thunderstorm to find a wet family of hawks.  The father was on a street light drying off and the mother was feeding two eyasses.

The other known Red-tailed Hawk second clutches in the city, Inwood Hill and Astoria/RFK Bridge, both fledged over the last few days.  A fledgling was seen in Inwood Hill by Jessica Ancker (via the Inwoodbirdwatchers Yahoo Group) and Peter Richter has pictures of the fledglings in Astoria on his Queens Raptors blog.


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RFK Bridge

Before I went on vacation, I went by and saw the freshly hatched eyasses nesting on the Astoria side of the RFK Bridge.  I finally got back to see how they were doing on Saturday.  The two of them looked great.

They look healthy and very grown up.  Their tails need to grow in before they'll be flying off, but they'll be leaving the nest soon.


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Astoria Nest

I got my first glimpse of a RFK Bridge nest eyass this evening.  From the feeding behavior of the mother, there are at least two eyasses. My guess is two, but it's too early to tell for sure.  It's a strange season, when a new eyass is seen the same day as a fledge!


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RFK Bridge

Earlier this spring, the Astoria female died due to poisoning while she was sitting on her nest.  Within a few days, the male found a new mate and they laid a fresh set of eggs.

While we can't see the hatchlings yet, based on the behavior of the mother, it looks like they have hatched.  We'll know how many there are in a few days.


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Unisphere Duo

The two surviving eyasses at the Unisphere in Corona Flushing Meadows Park are doing well.  They look ready to fledge.  For information about what happened earlier this season, see Peter Richer's Queens Raptor blog.


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Christmas Bird Count

The annual Christmas Bird Count was held in Central Park.  The snow storm had tapered off just in time for a nice morning in the park. 

Counting in fresh snow was good exercise, although it kept the count numbers down. I birded the Northwest.  Highlights included a female Wood Duck and a Great Blue Heron (most likely the same bird Jack Meyer saw earlier in the week on the Lake).  Our group had two raptor species, a Cooper's Hawk and a pair of Red-tailed Hawks.

An unusual species for the count was a Turkey Vulture, with multiple fly overs the park.  Speculation was that heavy snow forced the vultures south.  The Riverside Park count even had a Bald Eagle.  So the weather was a mixed blessing.

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Red-tails, Cooper's and Screech-Owls

I walked up from the mid-70s to the North Woods to look for Screech-Owls and came along some interesting diversions along the way.  On a building at 89th Street and Central Park West was a Red-tailed Hawk.  This section of the park, west of the Reservoir, usually has a Red-tailed guest during the winter.  To my surprise there were two Red-tailed Hawks, something I'm not used to seeing here.

Then while waiting for it to get dark, a Cooper's Hawk dove into the Loch.  It caught a squirrel and ate it.  It's the first time I've seen a Cooper's Hawk with a squirrel.

Lastly, I was able to see and hear both of the North Woods resident Eastern Screech-Owls.  They've switched roosts, so we felt lucky to find them.

On the way out of the park, I saw that the Lasker Pool is now the Lasker Rink!  Another sign of the changing seasons.

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Youngster in the Ramble

I went out in a break in the rain on Saturday to see if their was any sign of the Great-Horned Owl that had been spotted on two separate days in Central Park over the last week.  I didn't find the owl, but did find this 1st year Red-tailed Hawk.  It was right next to a cove on the Lake called the Oven.

Pictures include the bird eating a squirrel.  If that doesn't interest you skip this post.

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RFK Bridge Nest

The three eyasses looked great on my Saturday visit to the nest.  The nest is on a drain pipe on the Astoria, Queens side of the bridge.  On my visit I didn't see the parents, but I also didn't stay long.  It's not uncommon for a nest to be left unattended for long periods once the eyasses get close to fledging.


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Unisphere Nest in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens

Earlier this week arrived news from Bobby Horvath, the rehabilitator on Long Island, that an eyass had fallen out of the Unisphere.  The bird was taken to the Queens Zoo across the highway, checked out just fine, and ended up with in the Horvath's care.

The Unisphere nest has a history of having eyasses and fledglings in trouble.  The Unisphere's metal construction makes it difficult for a bird to "branch" and there have been birds that fall out of the nest prematurely in previous years.  The park itself is a problem for new fledglings, as it doesn't have very many quiet areas for the parents to lure them to.

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Photo: Bobby Horvath

The Hovarths continues to perform a great service for birds and wildlife in New York City.  If you're a NYC Raptor lover, I can think of no better donation then to help their organization.  If you’d like to make a monetary donation, checks can be made out to “Wildlife in Need of Rescue and Rehabilitation” and sent to:

WINORR, Inc.
202 N. Wyoming Avenue
North Massapequa, NY 11758

Since I hadn't been out to the nest since earlier in the season, I went out on Saturday to see how things had progressed at the nest.

When I arrived a parent was on the New York State Pavilion Towers and a visible eyass on the nest.  About fifteen minutes later, I saw a wing tip briefly from an I-beam of the Unisphere, three sections over from the nest.  So, the nest must have started three chicks, two still on the Unisphere and one now with the Horvaths.

Sunday Update: A second eyass fledged prematurely at the Unisphere and it is also now in the care of the Horvaths.


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RFK Bridge and Unisphere Nests

I made a quick trip out to the RFK Bridge and the Unisphere on Friday.  The RFK female was feeding young, but they didn't pop up into sight, so I stuck out again in my attempt to get a glimpse at them.

The female at the Unisphere was sitting on the nest.  It was impossible to tell if she was still sitting on eggs or had hatchlings.  The nest is recessed into an I beam, which makes it a great hiding place for youngsters.

I'll be checking back up on these nests in a few weeks.

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Astoria Park - RFK Bridge Nest

I spend early Sunday afternoon and late Monday evening looking for the eyasses (chicks) at the Astoria Park - RFK Bridge (formerly Triborough Bridge) nest without success.  It's clear by the parents behavior, that they're no longer sitting on eggs, but have hatchlings, but I didn't see them.  I must have missed the feeding each time I went, and if the eyasses are sleeping, they would be too low to see them.

In any event, I do have some nice pictures of the nest and the parents.

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Monday
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Unisphere 2009

Red-tailed hawks are once again nesting on the Unisphere in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, in Queens, New York.  This year, they have abandoned the old nest located off the coast of Somalia (fear of pirates?) in the Indian Ocean and built a new nest directly south of Los Angeles, in the Pacific Ocean.  The new nest, like the older ones, is on the equator.

The equator of the Unishere is a I-beam, and the female can be completely out of view if she wants to be.  I was there at sunset, so the picture quality is poor.  I'll be going back later in the season to see the eyasses.

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Manhattan Nests

From north to south, we have the following confirmed nesting sites in Manhattan this year:  Inwood Hill Park, Highbridge Park (back to the old location, which should be safer than last year's location), Lower Riverside Park (also in a new and safer location), Fifth Avenue and 888 Seventh Avenue.  I visited all of them this weekend.  They all seem to be in good shape, with chicks expected within the next few weeks.

Some nests have changed from last year. 

There is no sign of a nest below 14th Street, although there have been reports of hawks downtown all winter, including Tompkins Square Park, the World Trade Center construction site, the Court Houses around Center Street, Seward Park, Washington Square Park and the Greenway.

Last year's nest on Houston Street is not being used again this year.  The male from last year's nest died of Fronce and while hawks have been seen on the Lower East Side all winter, no signs of a new nest has been found.

The St. John the Divine's pair have both been seen recently but further uptown.  Construction continues on the church and they may have moved but no one has found a new nest location.  This one is a real mystery.

The Shepard Hall, City College nest looks bigger according to reports, but nest looks unoccupied.  The hawks may be nesting somewhere nearby.

Here are pictures of four nests from this weekend:

Inwood Hill Park

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Continue reading "Manhattan Nests" »


Riverside and Broadway

I spent the early afternoon looking at the Riverside Red-tailed Hawk pair on Saturday.  There nest is just off the Hudson River near 8st Street and looks great.  Last year they laid eggs around mid-March, so the female should start sitting on the nest soon.

Other nests in Manhattan are doing well.  Inwood Hill Park, Highbridge Park, St. John the Divine and 5th Avenue nests are doing fine.  The Highbridge nest is back to its old spot.

The Central Park South pair is still there but I don't have any details about their nest.  The Houston female lost her mate last year, and may be nesting on the ConEd plant around 14th Street.  The pair that was around the City College campus remains a mystery.

Sightings of hawks this winter around the north end of Riverside Park and around the Court House buildings on Center Street make these locations possibilities for new nests this year.

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When leaving Riverside Park, check out the American Kestrels that have a scrape at 80th and Broadway.  One of them is usually on the building south of Zabar's or on the church at 79th and Broadway.
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The Oven

The oven is a cove on the Lake of Central Park.  It attracts a good number of birds during each season, including the winter.

Today, there were a number of birds, including a Red-tailed Hawk, a Hermit Thrush, numerous Northern Cardinals, numerous Tufted Titmice, and a Cooper's Hawk that has been roosting in the same location nearby since at least early January.

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Drinking Red-tailed Hawk

I'm back in New York and finally had a chance to visit Central Park today.  Here are a few pictures of a young Red-tailed hawk taking a drink of water at one of the few ice free areas of the Lake today.

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Central Park Hawks After The Snow

On Sunday, I spent the late afternoon looking for Long-eared Owls without success.  But I did run into a few hawks.

On the Beresford Apartments, was Pale Male in the oval window, and Lola soaking up the sun on a south facing ledge.

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This young hawk was in the Ramble making its way between the official and the not so official bird feeders looking for customers to eat.

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This Sharp-shinned Hawk, with prey in talons, was being chased by a Red-tailed Hawk near 69th Street and the West Drive.  The Sharp-shinned Hawk evaded the Red-tail and got away with its prey.  Everything happened too fast for me to capture the action, but it reminded me that winter is the time to see lots of raptors in New York City.

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Croton-on-Hudson

I went up to Croton-on-Hudson to look for Bald Eagles today.  I didn't have any luck finding one, but did run into this Red-tailed Hawk who was hunting in a marsh.

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Thanksgiving Day

I went looking for Eastern-screech Owls today, but didn't have any luck finding them.  The familiar cavities and locations from last year, all turned up empty.  A few cavities even had squirrels where owls had been roosting last season.

The day wasn't a wash out however.  It included an adult Cooper's Hawk who led me from the Ramble to the Locust Grove. It also included two juvenile Red-tailed Hawks, who seem to get along just fine.  Both had just finished meals, and were in trees no more than 100 yards apart.

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Young vs. Established

The young hawk I had seen yesterday was in the same general area today.  I first saw it around the playgrounds north of Tavern on the Green, and then on a C.P.W. building around 68th Street.   Then it took off towards the Heckscher Ball Fields.  When I caught up with the hawk, it had just finished up eating and was cleaning its beak.

Then I spotted Charlotte, the female hawk from Central Park South, on one of the Ball Fields.  She took off towards the young hawk's tree with some prey.

The young hawk left, but ended up moving to a number of trees around the Ball Fields as Charlotte ate.  I could not figure out all of the dynamics, but something was surely going on between the two of them.

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Another Rainy Saturday

There was a window of a few hours this afternoon where the rain stopped and I could finally get some birding in.  Between the weather and the end of daylight savings time, it's been difficult to get to the park.

Eastern-screech Owl season begins in a few weeks.  The owls which are very difficult to find in the fall should soon be switching to cavities from daytime tree roosts, where they'll be much easier to find.  I'm not sure if it's the lack of tree leaves, the cold weather or the combination that causes the switch.

There had been reports of occasional owl sightings around The Mall and the Sheep Meadow within the last few months, so I did a loop around the area.  No luck finding an owl today, but I did find this juvenile Red-tailed Hawk, just north of the Lawn Bowling Greens.

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Juvenile Red-tailed Hawk and an Accipiter (Warning - Bird being eaten)

The Blue Jays in the park have been making lots of noise these last few weeks.  Most of the time it seems to be a false alarm, but this afternoon they were helpful.  They helped me find a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk and an Accipiter (either a Cooper's Hawk or Sharp-shinned Hawk).  They were west of the Conservatory Garden and east of the Compost Heap.

All of the pictures but the last one are of the Red-tail.  It was eating something with a thin band on each leg.  I didn't stay long enough to see if they got swollowed.

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The Accipiter came swooping in and landed on the far side of the Conservatory fence and I couldn't get an I.D.  It flew west.  I ran after it but couldn't find it once I got up to the Compost Heap.


Astoria Park Confusion

I got an email on Saturday, that two hawks had been found dead at Astoria Park.  Excellent follow up by the Urban Park Rangers in Queens discovered two dead chickens rather than hawks.  Dead chickens have been a problem in the park this summer, most likely from Santería animal sacrifices.  While I'm relieved that the hawks are in good health, I do feel some sadness about the chickens.

Here are pictures of the Astoria hawks.  Two from last weekend and three from this Sunday.

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North Woods Juvenile Red-tailed Hawk

The juvenile Red-tailed Hawk, who spends its time in the North Woods and the Great Hill (and most likely is one of the St. John the Divine offspring) was hunting in The Loch on Saturday afternoon.

It has shocked me that no one seems to be interested in this youngster.  Lots of people complain about how much they miss watching the offspring of Pale Male and Lola.  But, here's a wonderful juvenile bird only twenty five blocks north of Pale Male and Lola's nest and no one is watching it.

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Astoria Park

I hadn't been able to make it out to Astoria for awhile, but made it out on Saturday.   I was able to see both parents on Triborough Bridge.  They were on opposite sides of the Queens tower of the suspension bridge, just below the roadway level.

I wasn't able to find the surviving juvenile hawk from this pair nicknamed, Buster by the neighborhood.  The hawk from the Lower East Side that was released into the park and had to be returned to rehab after a case of Frounce has unfortunately died. 

The surviving fledgling from the Lower East Side, was recently released in Astoria Park and nicknamed Hank.  This hawk did not stay in the park.  However, hawk sightings further south along the river closer to the Queensborough Bridge have locals wondering if this hawk might be Hank.

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Fort Tryon

I hadn't been to Fort Tryon this season, so I thought it would be worth a look.  I ended up getting drenched in a thunderstorm, but I did see one Red-tailed Hawk on a building bordering the park at 196th and Broadway.  It was a second year hawk, with its tail feathers in molt.  It had a few old stripped brown tail feathers and a few new red ones.

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062908ftrt06There is an old brown tail feather on the right, two new feathers growing in in the middle, and two new red feathers on the left.


Astoria Park

Astoria Park has two fledglings in the park.  Both looked like they were doing well.  One was enjoying a branch of a tree, while the other was on a high diving board when I was there.

The foot up or foot out poses are quite common for Red-tailed Hawks.  They aren't a sign anything is wrong, they're just shifting their weight from one foot to another.

The Triborough bridge is in the background of the last photograph.

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Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, New York

When the New York Times had information about the Riverside Hawks on their blog, someone wrote that there was a nest on the Nurse's Residence of Jacobi Medical Center.  It was a nice day on Sunday, so I made the trip out to Jacobi.

I found a nest that looked like one from a previous year, but didn't see any hawks.  It's possible the hawks are nesting on a different section of the building and I couldn't see them.  Anyone work at Jacobi, who can take a look down at the Nurse's Residence?

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CCNY Nest Looks Unused

After learning of the City College nest on Shepard Hall, I've been taking a look at it ever few weeks.  It appears to have been unused.

It's unclear if the pair had prepared the nest but used an alternate site or if the nest failed for some reason.

In any case here is a recent photo of the nest.  If it had eyasses in the nest, there would certainly be dirty by now!

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Trio on Triborough

I got a message from Lincoln Karim that the Triborough Bridge pair was actually a trio, so I went out Saturday afternoon.

I got to see the eyasses and the mother.  The mother had been sick and was restored to good health under the care of Bobby Horvath.  You'll see she's banded.

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Unisphere 2008

Thanks to a text message from Lincoln Karim, I went out to the Unisphere in Flushing Meadows, Queens and was able to find the new Red-tailed Hawk nest location.  It is about minus 30 degrees of longitude from the old nest.  Instead of being near Indonesia, it is now in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Somalia.

I had received reports earlier in the season that the nest site was empty.  The nest is in an I-beam, so it must be easy for the mother to hide while brooding and for the eyasses to hide when they are young.

There are at least two chicks in the nest.  In the pictures that follow, the mother captures, eats and feeds a young pigeon to her eyasses.  Readers beware.

051908unrt01 The Unisphere

051908unrt02 On the left, East Africa, the nest is in the center, and the adult female is on the right.

051908unrt03 The adult female perches on a light around the perimeter of the Unisphere plaza.

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051908unrt05 The adult female hunts at the bottom of the Unisphere. 

051908unrt06 There are a number of nesting pigeons, and she grabs a juvenile pigeon.

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051908unrt08 After eating a great deal, she takes a piece to the nest after a few stops to gain altitude.

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051908unrt12 Landing on the nest.

051908unrt13 My first sighting of an eyas.

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051908unrt20 Two eyasses.

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051908unrt22 Two young heads.

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051908unrt27 The adult female on Cuba. 

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