Twig Delivery To The Majestic Apartments

On Thursday, I got to see another twig delivery to the Majestic Apartments.  The nest building should have been done weeks ago, so it will interesting to see how things turn out this year.

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2020 Manhattan Red-tailed Hawk Nest Update 5

Sadly, the female of the Washington Square Park nest disappeared sometime in the late morning on Thursday and hasn't been seen since.  The nest has been abandoned. 

My thoughts go out to all of those folks who watched the live camera feed.  I know for many folks isolated in their apartments it had been a blessing.

The female is presumed dead.  There is a very small chance she is injured or trapped somewhere, but it is unlikely.  NYU staff have checked nearby roofs.

Hawks 2020-5


2020 Manhattan Red-tailed Hawk Nest Update 4

This will most likely be the last chart for awhile.  The COVID-19 crisis is making it difficult to continue reporting.

Since the last update:

  • It has been confirmed that the Inwood Hill Park nest is occupied
  • Three eggs have been laid in Washington Square Park
  • The San Remo pair are now building a nest on The Majestic Apartments
  • Unconfirmed reports are the 350 Central Park West is now occupied

For all of us staying at home, Laura Goggin, made a nice summary of web cameras on her blog.  It should help many of us with cabin fever.

Hawks 2020-4

 

 


The Majestic Apartments

Peter Post emailed me that there has been Red-tailed Hawk nest building activity on the The Majestic Apartments this week, at 72nd and Central Park West.  This is most likely the San Remo pair.  They are nesting on the eastern face of the north tower, two floor of windows down from the top, just left of center.

While on my social distancing complaint, mental health walk today, I was able to photograph them briefly.

In addition to this news, I received a note from Jessica Ancker up in Inwood that that pair is brooding.

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2020 Manhattan Red-tailed Hawk Nest Update 2

Sad news from Morningside Park.  The male from the St. John nest was found lethargic and died shortly after being taken into rehab.  More about the death can be found on the WINORR facebook page.

The other news is about two possible nests and a new location for nest building on the San Remo.   It was also nice to see Lincoln Karim's picture of Pale Male and Octavia copulating this weekend.  Let's hope there eggs hatch this year.

With the COVID-19 outbreak in NYC, reports may be more sporadic this year. Practicing social distancing will be more important than hawk watching over the next few months.

Hawks 2020


Long-tailed Duck

Mary Beth Kopper found a Long-tailed Duck on the Central Park Reservoir on Saturday.  A bird common in New York harbor, is very rarely seen in Central Park.  The female slept most of the time it was on the reservoir before becoming active later in the day.

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Spring Is Here

On Wednesday, thanks to a report from Deborra Mullins, I had my first warbler of the season, a Pine Warbler.  Eastern Phoebes are also being reporting in Central Park.  After a quiet winter, spring migration is very welcome. 

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Another Day At 350 CPW

There wasn't much excitement this afternoon.   Just the usual pre-brooding stuff.  A copulation, some nest rearranging to make sure it is "just right", and then lots of hanging around close to the nest.  Bring on the eggs.

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American Woodcock

An American Woodcock was out in the open south of the Maintenance Field parking lot this morning.  However it got spooked and flew west. It decided to stay the whole afternoon perfectly still.  I came back at dusk and once it was dark it finally moved. 

I stayed and listened for bats, and had two Big Brown Bats in clear view flying at times a few feet from me.  I got some nice recordings.  On my way out, I was able to record two more Big Brown Bates on Cedar Hill, and possible got two recordings of a Silver-haired Bat.  I don't usually listen for bats this early and thought I might be lucky with the warm weather and see an Eastern Red Bad, which I didn't end up seeing or hearing.

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2020 Manhattan Red-tailed Hawk Nest Update 1

I'm starting to receive Red-tailed Hawk nest reports from around Manhattan.  Fort Washington and Tompkins Square Park have brooding hawks and there are reports of a nest being built on Governor's Island.  A pair of hawks has been seen copulating at 34th and 2nd Avenue, but the nest has not yet been located.  Drop me an email or comment on Facebook if you have updated news on any Manhattan nest.

Hawks 2020


350 Central Park West Reboot

The hawk nest at 350 Central Park West has had a hard time.  In 2018, the male died during the incubation period and while the female tried she could not incubate alone.  In 2019, after about two weeks, the eyasses (baby hawks) died on the nest and the female died a few weeks later. 

Over this last year, the nest was removed during façade work on the building. 

So, it's been a wonderful surprise that in under two weeks, the nest has been rebuilt.  If this nest wasn't so well watched, you might never know that the nest is new and both hawks aren't the originals. 

On Wednesday and Thursday, I got to see a lot of the hawks.  Early in the day or late in the day is best to catch up with them.  I saw them on the nest, bringing twigs, copulating and hunting. 

But what I didn't expect was what we got to see late on Thursday.  The male when from the nest to the 96th Street transverse road.  He would go about 100 feet, stopping mostly on streetlights.  He got to Fifth Avenue and 97th and did something I never would have expected.  He flew to Madison Avenue, then went south to 95th stopping first at 96th, before flying west back to the park.  What an urban hawk!

If you're trying to learn who is who, take a look at them copulating.   There are lots of field marks if you look closely. 

Let's hope "third time's a charm" for this nest.  It would be nice to see at least one year work out well for this nest.

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Two NYC Parks Wildlife Unit Programs

The NYC Parks Wildlife Unit asked me to help get the word out about two programs of interest to NYC Raptor enthusiasts in NYC...

Citizen Science: Raptor Monitoring with NYC Parks Wildlife Unit

2020 Raptor Nest Monitoring Project

The NYC Parks’ Wildlife Unit is reaching out to outdoor, park-caring enthusiasts for help scouting for raptor nests during the 2020 breeding season. NYC Parks records data on raptor nests, such as red-tailed hawks, cooper’s hawks, American kestrels, and others, found in or adjacent to park property. We are looking to recruit some additional eyes to scout throughout the city, especially in the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island (Northern Manhattan and Prospect Park, Brooklyn are already very well covered). Your assistance will be useful in creating a vivid picture of where birds of prey are nesting in NYC. This information will also be helpful for future conservation and education efforts conducted by NYC Parks and our partner agencies and organizations. We know you are already outside enjoying the outdoors and caring for Parks, we would love to put some of your observations to good use.

Scouts will be asked to:

  • commit to exploring an area of their choice to scout for nesting raptors, February through June 2020
  • participate in an online training session to learn more about the project
  • if a nest is found, scouts can commit to monitor the nest and send in weekly observations
  • strictly follow wildlife viewing ethics, to be discussed during training session

If interested in participating, please email or call. Also contact us with any additional questions.

Sunny Corrao Public Engagement Associate
NYC Parks’ Wildlife Unit
212-360-1447
[email protected]



Also note an upcoming raptor scouting session:

Citizen Science Raptor Nest Scouting Day
When: Saturday, March 14; 11:00 a.m.

Meet at the Greenbelt Nature Center; 700 Rockland Avenue; Staten Island

NYC Parks’ Wildlife Unit collects information regarding location and success of nesting birds of prey throughout NYC. Participate in our citizen science project and scout areas to find active nests around the Greenbelt in Staten Island. NYC Parks’ staff will provide basic training and binoculars to borrow, for those that need it. Pre-registration is preferred. To register or for more information please contact Public Engagement Associate Sunny Corrao by email or phone: [email protected] or 212-360-1447.