St John the Divine's South Side

The fledgling explored the southern side of the Cathedral this afternoon.  When I arrived I found the fledgling above St. James the Less with fuller's club (indicating manner of his martyrdom), and St. Philip with Latin cross (symbol of his crucifixion).  The fledgling then took a bath in a gutter.  Soon afterwards it flew to a decorative spire in the gardens.  When it saw a parent, it flew back to the Cathedral before flying to the south tower.  Later it flew back to the rear of the church.  It was nice to see the fledgling doing so well.

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St. John Update

I went up to St. John the Divine this afternoon to see how things were going with the fledglings.  One was above St. James and the mother on Angel Gabriel.  I photographed them and then made my way up to the Cathedral from Manhattan Avenue.  I was surprised to see an Urban Park Ranger car.  It turns out that one of the fledglings was on the ground just to the NE of the Cathedral in a driveway.  Sergeant Ranger Rob Mastrianni netted the bird, did a brief inspection of the bird and took it off to a rehabber for further inspection.  If it checks out OK, it will be returned to the area.

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St. John the Divine

Even though it was raining I had a great time at the Cathedral on Wednesday.  One of the eyasses flew from the nest (above St. Peter) to above St. James around 4:30.  The mother had been feeding and one of the eyasses just decided to fly 30 feet to the south on the church.  I left as it started to rain again but you pick up the rest of the evenings action on the Morningside Hawks blog.

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St. John Eyass

Robert's Morningside Hawks blog reported seeing an eyass on the St. John the Divine nest earlier in the week, so I made a stop there on Sunday.  I also saw a single eyass.  The nest is hard to view, so it might have a sibling we might get to see later in the season.

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St. John the Divine

I made another trip to St. John the Divine to see if my guess that the nest had hatched was correct.  I didn't see a feeding, but the female was up off the nest for about eight minutes.  So, while I still think the nest has hatched, I still don't have clear evidence.

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St. John the Divine

The St. John the Divine nest has most likely hatched given the behavior of the adults this evening.  The female was frequently up off the nest, was higher off the nest then she had been when I've seen her brooding earlier this season, and there was lots of fresh greenery on the nest. However, I'd like to see a feeding to be 100% sure.  We'll know more in a few days.

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St. John the Divine

St. John the Divine nest is active again this year. I saw the two parents exchange nesting duties.

I was doing a sweep of northern Manhattan and St. John was the only positive of note on my tour.  I came up empty at CCNY and J. Hood Wright Park, both of which have had their old nests removed.  There have to be nest between St. John and Inwood Hill Park.  Where are they?

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St. John the Divine

I hadn't been at the nest for over a month and realized I better visit before the eyasses got ready to fledge.  There are three youngsters, although it took some careful observing to make out all three at once.  It's good to see this nest get back to normal after all of the construction in the area over the last few years.

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St. John

All three kids have fledged from the Cathedral.  Two are doing well, but the third was found by the Police unable to stand on June 1st at 109th and Manhattan Avenue.  It is now with the rehabbers Cathy and Bobby Horvath.


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St. John The Divine

The nest which is now above the statue of St. Peter about ten feet has three eyasses this year.  With the construction over next door, and the nest bigger than last year, the parents seem back to a normal pattern this year. 


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Surprise, Surprise

Thanks to some great detective work by Melody Andres, we now know that both the Grant's Tomb (1) nest at 123rd Street and Riverside Drive and the 116th Street and Riverside Drive nest (2) are both active with two different pairs of hawks.  These are close by to a Peregrine Falcon scrape (3) at Riverside Church, and close to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine nest site (4).

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I had always thought Manhattan Hawk and Peregrine nests were like a checkerboard, with each taking different squares, but these three nests are so close together that it defies all that I had believed about nest positioning in the city.

Grant's Tomb


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116th Street and Riverside Drive


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Two Weeks Old?

At the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, there was one visible eyass on the nest.  It may have been two weeks old, which makes the fledge time somewhere in August. 

It was hard to tell if there were other eyasses in the nest.  The feeding behavior of the mother made it seem as though two were possible.  We'll just have to wait until they're bigger!


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Good News from St. John

The Morningside Hawks Blog has reported feeding activity up at St. John, so I checked it out this afternoon.  The new nest location this year is one saint clockwise from previous years, above St. Peter.  Previously, it was a little lower down on the shoulders of St. Andrew.

While I was there there were two feedings, and I saw a slice come out of the nest.  The eyasses are too small to see just yet, but the feeding and the slice are enough to let us know there are youngsters.

This late hatch is most likely from a second clutch of eggs.


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Hat Trick

Three nests had fledges today, Fifth Avenue, St. John the Divine and Washington Square.  For Washington Square it was the second fledge.

This evening, I got to see the first and second Washington Square Park fledglings.  The first fledgling had made it to the safety of the NYU Pless Hall roof.  The second and newest fledgling was doing its best to hide in a small tree west of the Bocce Court.

Both fledglings looked healthy.  (You know you've watching hawks to long when you study video for signs of Frounce.) The second fledgling seemed to be having some trouble getting to higher branches, but that's not too unusual for a hawk's first day off the nest.

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St. John the Divine

I finally had a chance to get up to St. John the Divine tonight.  Construction has started on a new building right next to the nest, so this may be the last season for this nest.  We'll see what happens next year.

But for now there are three very cute eyasses enjoying their nest on the shoulders of St. Andrew.


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St. John All Fledged

All of the eyasses have fledged at St. John the Divine.  This afternoon two were on or near the fences at the parking lot and the third was in a windows of a St. Luke's Hospital building across the street.  Both parents were keeping an eye on all of them.


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Cathedral, Tree, Nest

Up at the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine the three youngsters are in various states.  One fledged a few days ago and is exploring the Cathedral with ease and was above the nest in a turret when I arrived.  One had recently fledged and was in a tree across the street in Morningside Park. (Jeremy Seto's footage of the fledge is on Flickr.) And the third was still on the nest.

The parents came to visit the eyass still on the nest.  The father delivered a rodent, and the mother visited for a few minutes, right afterwards.  An American Kestrel gave one of the parents a hard time, while it perched on St. Luke Hospital's Plant building.


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St. John the Divine Duo

I had the good fortune to be at the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine nest at the right time to see two eyasses on the nest.  We never know for sure how many eyasses are on this nest until late in the season.  For some reason it's easy of for a third eyass to hide in this nest.


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